We Are Both Right

Happy with My Choice to Be a Work-From-Home Mom

©hortongrou/stock.xchng

I used to commute to work via train every day. Now my pace is a bit slower. ©hortongrou/stock.xchng

When you are insecure about something, it’s always nice when you find out that there are other people worried about the same things.

I’ve been a stay-at-home/work-at-home mom for eleven years. You’d think by now I’d be confident about my station in life. Not even close. Because I think I’ll have it all under control — I will have met all my deadlines, I will have changed the sheets on the bed and prepare a decent meal (plus dessert) — and then something (somethings) will reel me back into earth (the story will change, the toddler will spill something on the bed, the stove won’t work and the soufflé will collapse) and I’ll go back to being convinced that sometime soon everyone will see me for the fraud I am — a woman with a dirty house and unkempt kids who can’t cook, nor diagram a sentence to save her life.

But as it turns out, I’m not alone. Not about the last part anyway (not that anyone would admit to it), but about feeling insecure. A recent study by Working Mother magazine reports that lots of moms — both working and stay-at-home — have some very real concerns about where they are in life and how to balance it all.

Most interesting to me? That nearly half of the over 3,700 moms polled (49 percent of working and 47 percent of stay-at-home) say they are their own toughest critics.

That’s a lot of intelligent, resourceful, supermoms doubting themselves. So I guess I’m in good company.

Interestingly enough, my decision to stay at home and not pursue a “high powered” career, is something I feel totally confident about. The only time I ever slightly wavered my choice to be a work-at-home mom came early on in my tenure. I was a new mom to a baby boy, working full-time from home, commuting to my office just once a week. The position directly above mine suddenly became free. It would have been a nice jump professionally (especially at my young age, 26), not to mention a huge salary bump.

It wasn’t a role I could do from home though, it was definitely an in-the-office job. Especially when you remember that it was over a decade ago when working from home was still an incredibly new concept (I was the first in my company to do it) and things that make telecommuting a natural, cost-saving measure like Wi-Fi and Skype were non-existent (I used a phone line to dial in to our computer network. Adorable!).

I quickly got over any pangs of regret I might have been feeling — being a work-at-home/stay-at-home mom suited me. In fact, I liked it so much that when my daughter was born two years later, I left that position as I was required to work 9 to 5 hours — difficult with a toddler and a newborn. Since then I’ve kept up a fairly decent freelance career with a nice mix of long-term and short-term writing and editing clients. And while sometimes I wish our financial situation was a little more stable, being able to stay at home with all three of my kids and watch them grow up and support them in every way is something I’m so happy I get the opportunity to do.

Even if I burn the chocolate chip cookies sometimes.

What “type” of mom are you? What do you question about yourself? Would you change any of your past decisions?

On days when I’m just happy I haven’t burned down the house, I think about Suzanne and how she really does it all. And I’m jealous. Because she always looks a lot less frantic than me when she does it.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Choosing to Make Things Work as a Working Mom « We Are Both Right

Leave a Reply